Ellis Island, the busiest immigrant inspection gateway in the U.S. for over 60 years, opened the doors to America for over 12 million immigrants starting on January 1, 1892.

For many, the journey that brought them under the watchful gaze of the Statue of Liberty was often a difficult one; some fled tyranny and oppression, others impoverished conditions, but all came to America hoping for a better life for them and their loved ones. The road was not always an easy one for the country’s future citizens, but the stories that continued to grow with each ferry crossing the waters of Upper New York Bay are a historical reminder of why the United States means so much to Americans from sea to shining sea.

Image: New York Public Library

The first view of America would come from the deck of a commercial steamship as it entered New York Harbour. Steerage passengers would board ferries at the East River or Hudson piers, where they would be shuttled to Ellis Island.

Image: New York Public Library

Some were fleeing political oppression or famine.

Image: New York Public Library

For others it was violence and religious persecution.

Image: New York Public Library

On its first day of operations 700 immigrants arrived via three large boats and were processed. The first through the doors was Irish teenager Annie Moore and her two brothers, all of whom were on their way to a reunion with their parents who had already successfully arrived in New York and then sent for their children. During peak times, 5,000 immigrants daily were being processed. On a record-setting day, 11,747 people were processed (April 17, 1907).

Image: New York Public Library

In its first twenty years open the majority of immigrants landing at Ellis Island were there from Northern and Western Europe. In this timespan nearly nine million people arrived on the island’s docks.

Image: New York Public Library

In the early 1900s millions of immigrants from around the globe were setting off for America, arriving from countries like Austria, Hungary, Italy, Russia, Japan, the West Indies, Greece and Mexico. In 1907 alone 1.25 million immigrants were processed on the island.

Image: New York Public Library

Over 100 million Americans today can trace their ancestry to a relative who landed at Ellis Island.

Image: New York Public Library

Everyone had to undergo a medical examination upon arrival. If an individual was visibly ill, it could be grounds to be refused entry. The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital was the largest marine hospital in the country, and dealt with cases such as cholera and tuberculosis daily. At its height it had 28 wards, four operating theatres and a morgue.

Image: New York Public Library

All arrivals were required to have at least $18 on them upon inspection (approximately $600), a figure the government decided was what would be required for someone to support themselves while they adjusted to life in a new country.

Image: New York Public Library

Immigrants were asked a series of 29 questions, including who the current president of the United States was.

Image: New York Public Library

The inspection process usually lasted between 2-5 hours, with roughly 2% of those wanting entry being refused for a variety of reasons including chronic contagious health conditions, being an unskilled labourer, having a criminal record, or mental health issues. It was those denied entries that gained Ellis Island the nickname, ‘the Island of Tears’.

Image: New York Public Library

In the case of many immigrants this would be the menu for the first meal they ever had in a free country.

Image: New York Public Library

For some of these new arrivals a reunion with their families would be taking place upon a successful inspection at the Kissing Post, an area outside of the registry office that was often the scene of many a public display of emotion-both of the kissing and crying variety.

Image: New York Public Library

Ellis Island officially closed on November 12, 1954. It was opened to the public in 1976 and visitors can now tour the Immigration Museum and check immigrant arrival records released in 2001 for their ancestors.

“I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.”  – Thomas Jefferson

 


Has one of your ancestors come through Ellis Island? Let us know in the comments below.

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Jay Moon

Jay Moon is a writer who has turned the wanderlust that found him backpacking around Canada and the U.S. as a young lad into a writing lust that has him embracing the opportunity to cover topics about anything (and everything) he can get his now middle-aged eyes, ears, and hands on.